SAMPLE ME THIS: Take A Deep Breath by Philosophy

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I regularly use Philosophy’s Hope In A Jar, so when I got a sample of Take A Deep Breath, a product that focuses on “oxygen” to help skin “breathe” better, I was like, OK, what the heck is this?  It’s one thing to moisturize or use something to block UV rays, but quite another to “help” skin with the oxygen.  Doesn’t skin already naturally breathe?

The claim on the website reads:  “lightweight and oil-free oxygenating moisture helps skin recover from daily life and resist aging”.  Hmmm.

Also reads:  “Our first ever moisturizers with oxygen on demand via exclusive barley leaf extract.”

“Formulated with clean-air technology (oooh, it’s trademarked! oh, and gotta love the bold – make sure the customer knows these are key words there!) featuring barley leaf extract & patented antioxidant blend, to deliver oxygen to your skin so it feels like it can breathe freely.”

Is there a reason why skin wouldn’t breathe freely?  Isn’t that a protection in itself?  What is my skin trying NOT to absorb that this formula will do inadvertently?  Could this cause more harm than good?

Intrigued, I continued to read up on philosophy’s website as to how this “skin not breathing freely” is some new phenomena or something.

The current collection features the gel cream, the eye gel cream, (both oxygenating), a cushion foundation, cushion cheek color, and a “sheer liquid sunshine” (their words) for what looks like bronzer.

It seems they use natural ingredients such as orange peel, angelica root, coffee bean, rosemary.  There is a yeast element in here, not sure what yeast plays into the collection, maybe the barley element.  And it’s oil-free.  But rosemary and orange peel — secrete oils.

Here are the ingredients for the oil free “oxygenating gel cream”, which I’m going to call “moisturizer” here on out and not to be confused with the eye gel one:

aqua/water/eau, bis-peg-18 methyl ether dimethyl silane, cyclopentasiloxane, caprylic/capric triglyceride, glycerin, isododecane, cyclohexasiloxane, butylene glycol, polyacrylamide, pentylene glycol, phenoxyethanol, dimethicone, octyldodecyl neopentanoate, c13-14 isoparaffin, hydrogenated lecithin, cetyl alcohol, methyl gluceth-20, polysorbate 80, bisabolol, hydrolyzed soy protein, ammonium acryloyldimethyltaurate/vp copolymer, carbomer, caffeine, tocopheryl acetate, laureth-7, parfum/fragrance, sodium hydroxide, disodium edta, adenosine, faex/yeast extract/extrait de levure, ectoin, o-cymen- 5-ol, benzyl salicylate, limonene, glucosyl hesperidin, lecithin, alcohol, alteromonas ferment extract, hordeum vulgare/hordeum vulgare extract/extrait d’orge, bht, camellia sinensis leaf extract, coffea arabica (coffee) seed extract, ethylhexylglycerin, pongamia pinnata seed extract, citronellol, citral, angelica archangelica root extract, citrus aurantium amara (bitter orange) peel extract, maltodextrin, rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) leaf extract, magnesium aluminum silicate, xanthan gum, peg-8, sorbic acid, farnesol, caprylyl glycol, citric acid, sclerotium gum, tocopherol, ascorbyl palmitate, ascorbic acid, fd&c yellow no. 5 (ci 19140), fd&c blue no. 1 (ci 42090)

here are the ingredients listed for the oxygenating eye cream, which seem to reflect most of the same ingredients as the product above, with differences in the order of how they appear – believe or not this is important:

aqua/water/eau, glycerin, pentylene glycol, dimethicone, caprylic/capric triglyceride, polyglyceryl-2 diisostearate, phenoxyethanol, bisabolol, hydrolyzed soy protein, ammonium acryloyldimethyltaurate/vp copolymer, polysilicone-11, polyacrylamide, acrylates/c10-30 alkyl acrylate crosspolymer, caffeine, cetearyl alcohol, cetyl alcohol, c13-14 isoparaffin, butylene glycol, glucosyl hesperidin, disodium edta, sodium hydroxide, laureth-7, cetearyl glucoside, adenosine, malachite extract, faex/yeast extract/extrait de levure, ectoin, hesperidin methyl chalcone, sodium hyaluronate, steareth-20, lecithin, alcohol, alteromonas ferment extract, hordeum vulgare/hordeum vulgare extract/extrait d’orge, sodium citrate, camellia sinensis leaf extract, coffea arabica (coffee) seed extract, ethylhexylglycerin, pongamia pinnata seed extract, angelica archangelica root extract, chlorhexidine digluconate, citrus aurantium amara (bitter orange) peel extract, maltodextrin, rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) leaf extract, magnesium aluminum silicate, xanthan gum, peg-8, sorbic acid, citric acid, dipeptide-2, farnesol, potassium sorbate, caprylyl glycol, sclerotium gum, tocopherol, palmitoyl tetrapeptide-7, ascorbyl palmitate, ascorbic acid.

Be warned that philosophy put an eye gel version out for a reason.  Do NOT put the regular one near your eye area, it will sting.  The eye version is a bit less sting-y on the eye area.  This eye cream is to be put under eyes, just a teensy little drop, and massage or dab very gently into the eye socket or skin area directly under your eye.

The description says it’s to brighten and take care of that tired eye look, make you look refreshed.

The smell is definitely citrus-y, I smell the orange peel, specifically the rind.  It has that kind of smell.  The smell and texture is the same for the moisturizer and the eye cream.  The texture is kind of on the runny side and blends into the skin if you don’t use too much.  If you have dry skin but hate oiliness this will be a definite winner.  Otherwise I wouldn’t use it for dry skin.  For winter it’s not going to be much of a barrier to keep the moisture in, it’s light.  If you have combination skin, it’s OK.  For oily skin, I think this might work if you are prone to breakouts and want something light.

Why barley leaf?  The site claims it helps with oxygenating. I went online to further check out barley and what it can do.  Barley is apparently rich in selenium, which improves skin elasticity, is anti-inflammatory, and is rich in zinc which helps with skin repair.  The bran in the barley also helps to exfoliate and control oil which can lead to brightening of the skin.

I checked the reviews on the website and most reviewers like that it takes away the puffiness — could be the coffee beans which contain caffeine that’s been proven to help decrease puffiness and rosemary and citrus helps with circulation by its oil reaction to skin by irritating it.

The moisturizer is $12.00 for .05 oz and $40.00 for 2 oz.

The eye cream is $42.00 and is .05 oz!

A little goes a long way on the eye cream and I would say the same for the moisturizer.

I’ve been using the samples for a couple of weeks and don’t see a huge difference on the eye gel under my eyes.  I only apply it once a day maybe that has something to do with it.  I read now on the site it should be once in the morning and once in the evening.  You figure with the price of the eyecream, this may get expensive.

I wouldn’t say yay or nay on this.  I like philosophy.  I just don’t notice a big difference.

BEFORE eye gel

before-eye-gel

AFTER eye gel (sorry about the flash, hazel eyes, I get the “red eye”!)

after-eye-gel2

 

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